Favorites I Own

Wow. An influx of followers! This is terrific! Thank you for joining the Steeplechase with me! (After all, what is a blog without followers?)

Let me know if you have read any of these and what you thought of them!

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They are a tiny bit hard to see, but whatever.

#1: War Horse by Michael Morpurgo

This book is positively amazing – and sad. Set in World War I, it is the story of a horse sold to the army to pull cannons, carry riders and whatnot…all told from the horse’s perspective. Very tear-jerking.

Reading level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Lessons learned: ♦♦◊◊◊
Sadness level: ♦♦♦♦♦
Scariness level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦♦♦♦◊
Humor level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Hard to find?: ◊◊◊◊◊

#2: The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart

A very thrilling novel that has an old-timey feel, despite being written in 2007. Tests your wits right alongside the characters!

Reading level: ♦♦♦♦◊
Lessons learned: ♦♦◊◊◊
Sadness level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ♦♦◊◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦♦◊◊◊
Humor level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Hard to find?: ◊◊◊◊◊

#3: Carry On, Mr. Bowditch by Jean Lee Latham

If I had not already heard of Nathaniel Bowditch, I would not have guessed this was a biography! It was amazing! Raving! Raving! Raving! Follows the life of Nathaniel Bowditch, the Father of American Navigation. Newbery winner!

Reading level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Lessons learned: ♦◊◊◊◊
Sadness level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Humor level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Hard to find?: ♦♦◊◊◊

#4: The Bronze Bow by Elizabeth George Speare

Set in the time of Jesus, this book was a life-changer. Has very strong moral and might make you cry from the resolve. Newbery winner!

Reading level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Lessons learned: ♦♦♦♦♦
Sadness level: ♦♦◊◊◊
Scariness level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦♦♦♦◊
Humor level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Hard to find?: ♦◊◊◊◊

#5: Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

Pre-1900! This book is very thrilling, and will keep you on the edge of your chair – IF YOU READ THE ORIGINAL! Do NOT settle for an abridged version! It is, as Charlie Brown once said, “not unlike drinking diluted root beer”. (P.S: Jules Verne is famous for making up things that don’t really exist, such as large sleighs rigged out in sails like schooners. If it sounds imaginary, it probably is.)

Reading level: ♦♦♦♦◊
Lessons learned: ♦◊◊◊◊
Sadness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Humor level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Hard to find?: ♦♦◊◊◊ (for an original version)

#6: The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnet

Pre-1900! A touching story about the power that caring for others gives you. Again, do not settle for an abridged version.

Reading level: ♦♦♦♦◊
Lessons learned: ♦♦◊◊◊
Sadness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Humor level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Hard to find?: ♦♦◊◊◊ (for an original version)

#7: Counting by 7s by Holly Goldberg Sloan

I have received critique on this book that complains that nothing happens. That isn’t true! You just have to analyze it! Plus, there are thousands of little details that you have wanted to see written into a story. Kind of sad. But very funny in other places.

Reading level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Lessons learned: ♦◊◊◊◊
Sadness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Humor level: ♦♦◊◊◊
Hard to find?: ◊◊◊◊◊

#8: A Final Reckoning by G. A. Henty

Henty is unknown to most of my generation. What a shame! His books are awesome, and there are 99 of them altogether, not mention two hundred something short stories! So far I have read five, and once you delve into this one, you’ll see why it has taken me since two years ago to read only five…This book is about the policemen of Australia back when it was still a prison colony. Read! (P.S: Some people give these books a bad rep for, er, characterizing the way African people talk. I don’t see anything wrong with it, and the Africans are often wayyyy smarter than the others, so if you have a problem with that, or if you can’t understand written accents, skip this one.)

Reading level: ♦♦♦♦♦
Lessons learned: ♦♦◊◊◊
Sadness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ♦♦♦♦◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Humor level: ♦♦♦◊◊ (if you have a weird sense of humor like Yours Truly)
Hard to find?: ♦♦♦♦♦ (only available from one publisher, whom I will cite at the end of this.)

#9: True to the Old Flag by G. A. Henty

#insert monolouge about Henty#
#insert monolouge about postscript#

With that done, I can talk about the book. This one is about the Revolutionary War. I suppose you think the ‘old flag’ is Old Glory? Think again! Henty was British, so he wrote about these events from the other side! Very exciting. Covers Bunker’s Hill, Lexington, Indian raids, Charleston, and many other interesting exploits. Tell me when you get to the part where they fire the train.

Final note: DO NOT CONFUSE CAPTAIN WILSON FROM A FINAL RECKONING WITH THE CAPTAIN WILSON IN THIS BOOK! When I was reading this aloud, I gave a three-second pause after every mention of Captain Wilson so to get the correct Captain Wilson in my readers’ minds.

Reading level: ♦♦♦♦♦
Lessons learned: ♦♦◊◊◊
Sadness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ♦♦♦♦◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Humor level: ♦♦♦◊◊ (ditto)
Hard to find?: ♦♦♦♦♦ (again, only available from one publisher, whom I will cite.)

#10: Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery (not shown)

This book is so sweet. The things Anne does are hilarious, too. Find the Barnes and Noble Classics edition with the gilded edge and bookmark – it is an edition worth having, and a steal at $10!

Reading level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Lessons learned: ♦♦◊◊◊
Sadness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Scariness level: ◊◊◊◊◊
Emotionally taxing level: ♦◊◊◊◊
Humor level: ♦♦♦◊◊
Hard to find?: ♦♦◊◊◊ (no dilutions!)

That’s basically it. To get the Hentys, visit robinsonbooks.com (I have helpfully brought it to the right page, and right now they are on sale for $12!). Tell me if you’ve read any of these or are considering it!

Yours Truly Until Death We Part,

Tess

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8 thoughts on “Favorites I Own

  1. Clara July 20, 2016 / 6:09 pm

    I’ve read The Mysterious Benedict Society, A Secret Garden, and Carry On, Mr. Bowditch. I love all 3 of them- in fact, I’ve read Carry On, Mr. Bowditch twice! 😉

    -Clara ❤

    Like

    • blackiesunshine July 21, 2016 / 5:03 pm

      Oh my goodness! “Come here, me proud beauty…” I thought that part was so funny, especially because things didn’t quite turn out the way he had daydreamed!!!!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. CutePolarBear July 20, 2016 / 6:29 pm

    I loved Carry On, Mr. Bowditch! In fact, I reread it often. 😉 I actually didn’t realize he was a real person, but I suspected it.

    CutePolarBear

    Like

      • CutePolarBear July 21, 2016 / 6:31 pm

        Haha! I don’t know if I quote it a lot, but I do think of the quotes!

        CutePolarBear

        Like

  3. Lily July 22, 2016 / 5:51 am

    Cool! I’ve read MBS, Anne of Green Gables, and the Secret Garden. 🙂

    Like

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